Calif. Families Sikes Alvin & Clara Alvin DNA Result Chart Contact
Richard 1610-1676 > ... > Jonathan 1830-1913 > Alvin     |     Sikes / Sykes DNA Project > Result Chart
Abbreviated results showing distances relataive to tests in the (Richard, Increase, Nathaniel, Nathaniel Jr., ... Johathan, Alvin, ...) line.
Sponsored by the Sikes/Sykes Families Association DYS # for marker (allele value = # of repeats shown below) H
3 3 1 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 a
Earliest Known
Ancestor
2nd
Generation
3rd
Generation
4th
Generation
gens-
to
Rich-
ard
dist-
ance
from
us [1]
9 9 9 9 8 8 2 8 3 8 9 8 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 4 4 6 6 6 6 p
3 0   1 5 5 6 8 9 9 2 9 8 9 9 5 4 7 7 8 9 4 4 4 4l
        a b       i   ii   a b             a b c d o
Richard Sikes
bc 1600
England
Increase
b 1644 MA
Nathaniel
b 1673 MA
Nathaniel 10 us 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 14 13 14 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 17 R1b1
Joseph 9 3 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 14 29 18  8  9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 18 R1b1
? 10 414 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 14 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 29 14 15 17 18R1b1
Victory
b 1649 MA
Jonathan
b 1675 MA
Jonathan 9 2 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 14 13 15 29 18  8  9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 18 R1b1
Samuel
b 1680 MA
Victory 9 8 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 15 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 14 15 15 R1b1c
Victory
b 1689 MA
Titus 9 2 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 14 13 15 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 18 R1b1c
Titus 9 3 14 23 15 11 11 14 12 12 13 13 15 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 18  
Thomas Sykes George b 1822
Yorkshire
John b 1853
Cheshire
  9 3 14 23 15 12 11 14 12 12 13 13 14 29 18 8 9 11 11 25 15 19 28 14 15 17 18  
English Sykes' (21) [2] Bryan Sykes and a plurality of those tested in his 1999 research described below. [2] 14 23 15 11 Brian initially did only 4 marker tests and has not shared the results of subsequent tests.
English Sykes' (3) Other Sykes' with different markers, can be attributed to non-paternity events (name change, adoption,...) or from other original Sykes'. The (n) is the number of Sykes from a test group of 48 English Sykes' tested by Bryan Sykes. See [3] below. 13 26 15 11
English Sykes' (5) 13 24 14 11
English Sykes' (3) 14 23 15 10
Other Sikes who immigrated to the southeastern U.S., but are not related. Num.
Tested
a/o 4/2007
Gens
to
1st
known
dist-
ance
from
us
 
John Sikes Walter
bc 1645 VA
James
bc 1676 VA
11 10 29 13 26 15 11 11 11 12 12 10 13 11 30 15 9 9 11 11 24 14 20 31 12 15 15 15
Sikes to NC Arthur
bc 1794 NC
William H.
b 1818 TN
7 6 19 13 24 14 12 11 14 12 12 11 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 18 30 15 15 16 16
John Sykes James b
1782 VA
Levi
bc 1807 VA
5 7 27 13 24 17 10 11 14 12 12 10 12 11 30 16 9 9 11 11 24 14 20 30 15 15 15 15
Joseph Sikes
bc 1770 SC
Jehu
bc 1800 GA
John
b 1829 GA
2 6 14 13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 14 13 30 16 8 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 16 17 17
Joel Sykes
bc 1729 VA
Joshua
bc VA
? 1 ? 30 14 23 15 10 14 15 11 15 11 13 12 32 15 8 9 11 11 25 14 20 28 11 14 14 15
Red DYS #s - Higher rate of mutation.
[1] Genetic Distance (25 marker test) from results for our line (Richard, Increase, Nathaniel, Nathaniel Jr., ... Johathan, Alvin, ...) represented by the first entry for Nathaniel. The sum of differences in allele values.
Distances for other pairwise tests:
25 Marker:
Jonathan & first Victory are exact matches.
Jonathan & second Victory (3rd Gen) and two Victories (3rd Gen) have a distance of 1.
37 Marker:
None with less than a distance of 2.

[2] The number in (#) is the number of Sykes from a test group of 48 English Sykes' tested by Bryan Sykes with that DYS#.

[3] In 1999, Bryan Sykes, the Oxford geneticist and author, tested 48 Sykes' in West Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cheshire counties in England. He talked about his conclusions in a 2000 article in The American Society of Human Genetics and a 2001 BBC radio special.
See Sykes Surname Origins for more information.

Bryan determined that most of the Sikes came from a common ancestor. The 50% of Sykes' who's Y chromosome resembled the normal variation of the general population can be explained by non-paternity events (name change, adoption,...) over the last 22 or more generations.

Other test results of mainly individuals without group matches are listed at the Sikes / Sykes DNA Project.

The top line in the chart represent results from one of Alvin's grandchildren. They confirm Alvin is related to Richard and also the largest family of Sykes in England, including Bryan Sykes and Sir Richard, retired chairman of GlaxoSmithKline and most likely to William del Sykes who farmed near Flockton, Yorkshire, England around 1280.
Many, probably a majority, of Sikes/Sykes in the U.S. are descended from other Sikes/Sykes immigrants who settled in the southern U.S. (NC, VA) and they are not directly related to us.

There are still three of the markers in the 25 marker DNA test for our family which have mutated thru the generations, so we need more tests from other lines to determine what Richards true values are for these and we are running out of volunteers. Several lines, like ours have daughtered out.

Our result for marker DYS392, 14 repeats, is consistent with the other test from our 7th great grandfather, Increase Sikes', descendants, while descendants of his brother, Victory, all have a 15 for this marker. So, there is a high probability that the mutation occurred with Victory, Increase or Nathaniel, our 6th great grandfather.

Marker DYS439 has different values for descendants of both Increase and Victory There are two 12's, one 13, & three 14's, so there appears to be the same mutation in multiple places.

Ann Turner, co-author of "Trace Your Roots with DNA: Use Your DNA to Complete Your Family Tree:" commented on our DYS439 results as follows:
"I'd guess at 14 for the ancestral value. It occurs in at least one line of descent from each son of Richard. But that would mean that a change from 14 to 12 occurred independently in two different lines, and a two-step difference is a little harder to swallow for parallel mutations. "

Our line and the Victory, Samuel line seem to have different mutations in 464d.

We may have to dig up some ancestors and try to extract DNA from their bones to resolve it :-) [no one has actually suggested this]. This is very difficult (Bryan Sykes research in this are is what got him started by analyzing cave man remains). Damp acidic soil in the northeast U.S. causes most remains including bones to be reduced to dark soil stains after 100 yrs.

We are also of Haplogroup R1b1. Anthropologists break down the Y-chromosome into branches called Haplogroups or clades, which distinguish major branches of Homo Sapiens. Haplogroup R1b1 is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago.
See: ycc.biosci.arizona.edu/nomenclature_system/summary.html for a report by the Y-Chromosome Consortium (YCC).

Terms:

Allelle - The number of repeats of a sequence in a marker.
DYS - DNA Y-chromosome Segment - markers are assigned DYS numbers.
Haplo - Haplogroup Identifies the person's major population group and
   provides information about the ancient origin.
   R1b1 is the most common haplogroup in European populations.
Marker - Repeated base-pair sequences (2-5 base-pairs) at specific locations 
     along the Y chromosome.  

Links:
The Sikes / Sykes DNA Project
  Result Chart similar to above.
We are getting our tests done at Family Tree DNA.
  their Turorial.
  Sykes/Sikes Family Project.
DNA Genealogy
DNA 101 at BlairGenealogy

Books:
"Trace Your Roots with DNA: Use Your DNA to Complete Your Family Tree:", Megan Smolenyak, Ann Turner
Adam's Curse, Bryan Sykes

Updated Sep 17, 2009